Picture from Scotland - Clematis Bush.

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FLOWER OF SCOTLAND - CLEMATIS BUSH

The Clematis (genus) consists of nearly 300 species, mostly deciduous, but some evergreen.Whilst they are spread widely over the temperate regions of the world, they mostly grow in the Northern Hemisphere.

The genus belongs to the family Ranunculaceae.

The two characteristics mostly associated with clematis are their habit of climbing and their beautiful flowers. Climbing is achieved by specially adapted petioles (leaf stalks) which wrap around suitable supports. If such supports are not available, they will not climb, say, a wall, but grow as a tangled mass or out along the ground. The ability to climb gives the genus its name, which is derived from the Greek klema.

The flowers do not carry true petals, carrying instead a group of 4 to 8 petal-like (petaloid) sepals (often referred to as tepals). In shape, the flowers are normally either a flat disk or bell shaped (campanulate), though other shapes, such as tubular, do occur. Flowers are normally bisexual, though some species have single sex flowers. They are normally solitary or in panicles.

Another important characteristic is the seed heads. Most species carry seed heads which become very attractive as they develop into fluffy balls as the seeds ripen. They truly form an extra benefit to be gained from growing the plants.

Clematis Bush
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